January 17, 2018

Winner of the Joel A. Tarr Envirotech Article Prize for 2011

We are pleased to announce that Christopher F. Jones is the winner of the 2011 Joel A. Tarr Envirotech Prize for his article, “A Landscape of Energy Abundance: Anthracite Coal Canals and the Roots of American Fossil Fuel Dependence, 1820-1860,” “Environmental History” 15 (July 2010): 449-484. In his article, Jones uses the concept of an “energy landscape” as an effective new tool for visualizing the causes and consequences of society’s energy choices, as well as the contingencies that inform the process of energy change. Drawing upon but also extending the seminal work of William Cronon and James Scott, Jones demonstrates that entrepreneurs, boosters, and other modernists built a new transportation-based energy regime in advance of market

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demand. By transforming the built environment and aggressively encouraging consumers to adopt anthracite coal, Jones argues, this regime helped to foster the subsequent and ultimately unsustainable American shift to fossil fuel sources that has continued to this day. Prize committee members applauded Jones for his skillful fusing of a detailed empirical analysis of the American Mid-Atlantic region with the broader theoretical concept of “energy landscapes.” Jones also breaks new ground in incorporating the spatial issue of transportation networks into our understanding of energy systems. By offering a fresh approach to dealing with the complex interactions between cultural, economic, technological, and ecological factors, Jones makes an important contribution to the field of envirotechnical history and theory.

Winner of the Coffman Prize for 2011

Congratulations to Kathryn S. Meier of the University of Scranton, this year’s winner of the Coffman Prize for her manuscript “The Seasoned Soldier: Coping with the Environment in Civil War Virginia.” The Coffman Prize recognizes scholars whose work blends military history with social, political, economic, and diplomatic history and to authors of studies

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centering on campaigns, leaders, technology, and doctrine. It is awared by the Society for Military History to a scholar who has not yet published a book-length manuscript and includes the opportunity to publish the book with University of North Carolina Press. More on the Coffman Prize can be found here.

Winner of the Jack Temple Kirby Prize for 2011

Congratulations to James C. Giesen of Mississippi State University, whose article, “‘The Truth about the Boll Weevil’: The Nature of Planter Power in the Mississippi Delta” (Environmental History 14, no. 4 (October 2009): 683-704), was selected as the inaugural winner of the Jack

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Temple Kirby Award. The Kirby Award is given by the Southern Historical Association to the best article in Southern environmental and agricultural history in any journal in the previous year. More information on the Kirby Prize can be found here.

News

A recent article in Bowdoin College’s Bowdoin Daily Sun highlights Wallace Scot McFarlane’s April 2012 EH piece on the Androscoggin River, including an interview with McFarlane about his research (CLICK HERE). MacFarlane’s work is also highlighted on the Oxford University Press blog.

Field Notes

To complement this issue’s special forum on the Japanese disasters of March 2011, this Gallery essay by Christine Marran analyzes photographs taken during the tsunami and the subsequent nuclear meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plants.

Gallery Essay

Seeing Double: Visibility and Legibility in Photography of 3-11 By Christine

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Marran.


To complement this issue’s special forum on the Japanese disasters of March 2011, this Gallery essay by Christine Marran analyzes photographs taken during the tsunami and soon after the subsequent nuclear meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plants.

—Neil M. Maher and Cindy Ott

Advanced Acess

Advance Access articles are papers that have been copyedited and typeset but not yet paginated for inclusion in an issue of Environmental History. Advance Access enables readers to access papers online soon after they have been accepted for publication and well ahead of their appearance in the printed journal, thus greatly reducing publication times.